Sourdough Discard Crepes (2024)

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Sourdough crepes were a game changer for our family. An easy way to use extra sourdough starter discard and get breakfast to the table quick!

Sourdough Discard Crepes (1)

When I first began with sourdough I was overwhelmed by trying to find recipes to use the discard from my starter. My family was not yet accustomed to the taste, and keeping my sourdough alive and active seemed like a feat in itself. Maybe you feel the same way if you are new to the sourdough journey. Maybe you’re an old pro looking to expand your recipe box. Either way this sourdough crepe recipe can be for you!

Fast forward two years, and now I have several discard recipes that I use regularly. I sometimes wonder how in the world they seemed like such a big overwhelming thing when I was first starting out. Once you master using discard, it opens up a whole universe of sourdough possibilities. I now understand how people can keep a huge jar of starter going on their counter and not have it all go to waste. I wish that for you too, my friend, and believe you can get there if you’re not already.

Why Sourdough Crepes?

My children LOVE crepes. It’s something they ask for regularly, and we have a great recipe that we have loved for many years,. However, it requires a good amount of prep work, a lot of whisking to get all of the lumps out, and a rest time to let the batter all come together.

When I came across the idea of sourdough crepes it was a total game changer. I combined a couple sourdough crepe recipes I found online with the traditional one we were currently using to come up with this combination. Not only did it reduce the prep time for my children’s favorite breakfast treat, but it also provided a healthier alternative to the recipe that we found in one of my old cookbooks. As an added bonus it was a way to use up that ever present sourdough starter discard. Since we also have our own hens, recipes that use a lot of eggs are always on my radar!

Sourdough Discard Crepes

Ingredients:

  • 5 eggs
  • 2 cups fed sourdough starter
  • 2 Tbsp. olive oil
  • 1 Tbsp. sugar (optional)
  • Milk, if needed
  • Salt, to taste

Directions:

Begin by whisking together the eggs, sourdough starter, oil, and sugar in a medium bowl. I don’t measure too closely, so you can choose to eyeball if you like.

If needed, add enough milk too thin the batter out to an easy pouring consistency. I suggest starting with a tablespoon at a time. If your sourdough starter already has a high hydration and is pretty runny, you should not need to add any milk. You want the batter pretty thin, but not liquid. I personally run a starter with a higher hydration and find adding the milk actually makes the batter too thin. Too much milk in the batter has led me to find that the crepes bubble as they cook and get small holes in them that filling can leak out. Only add milk if absolutely necessary, and after trying a couple crepes without it.

Add a pinch of salt to taste. Finish whisking it all together.

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Heat a non-stick skillet over medium-low heat (I use 3-4 on my 1-10 burner).

Ladle 1/4 of a cup of batter into the bottom of the skillet. Lift the skillet off the stove and give it a swirl with your wrist to spread the batter evenly over the bottom of the pan. It will start to cook immediately.

Place back on the burner and allow to cook for 20-30 seconds, until the bottom side is firm, light brown, and slightly crispy. Then, use a spatula to flip the crepe over and cook for another 15-20 seconds until the moisture is cooked out and it is no longer shiny.

Transfer the crepe to a plate, and repeat the process until you have used up all of your batter.

How many crepes you will get depends on how thick you pour the batter and the size of your pan. I get approximately 15 sourdough discard crepes from this recipe, enough to serve 4-5 people.

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To Serve

I like to serve our crepes with fresh whipped cream, fresh or frozen fruit, peanut butter, Nutella, and chocolate chips. It’s definitely a dessert style breakfast which is probably why the kids like it so much.

Find my recipe for from scratch WHIPPED CREAM here.

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Sourdough Discard Crepes (4)
Sourdough Discard Crepes (5)

Sourdough Discard Crepes

Yield: Serves 4-5

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Cook Time: 15 minutes

Total Time: 20 minutes

Sourdough crepes were a game changer for our family. An easy way to use extra sourdough starter discard and get breakfast to the table quick!

Ingredients

  • 5 eggs
  • 2 cups sourdough starter
  • 2 Tbsp. olive oil
  • 1 Tbsp. sugar (optional)
  • Milk, as needed
  • Salt, to taste

Instructions

    Directions:

    1. Begin by whisking together the eggs, sourdough starter, oil, and sugar in a medium bowl. If needed, add enough milk to thin the batter out too an easy pouring consistency. You want the batter pretty thin, but not liquid.
    2. Add a pinch of salt to taste. Finish whisking it all together
    3. Heat a non-stick skillet over medium-low heat. Ladle 1/4 of a cup of batter into the bottom of the skillet. Lift the skillet off the stove and give it a swirl with your wrist to spread the batter evenly over the bottom of the pan. It will start to cook immediately.
    4. Place back on the burner and allow to cook for 20-30 seconds, until the bottom side is firm, light brown, and slightly crispy. Then, use a spatula to flip the crepe over and cook for another 15-20 seconds until the moisture is cooked out and it is no longer shiny.
    5. Transfer the crepe to a plate, and repeat the process until you have used up all of your batter.
    6. This recipe yields approximately 15 crepes and serves 4-5 people.

    To Serve:

    1. I like to serve our crepes with fresh whipped cream, fresh or frozen fruit, peanut butter, Nutella, and chocolate chips. It's definitely a dessert style breakfast which is probably why the kids like it so much.

    Did you make this recipe?

    Please leave a comment on the blog or share a photo on Instagram

    Watch Sourdough Discard Crepes Being Made

    Sourdough crepes are a delightful way to repurpose sourdough starter discard, adding a tangy depth to a breakfast favorite. The concept of using sourdough discard isn't just a creative culinary choice; it's also a sustainable approach to minimizing food waste.

    As for my expertise, I've dived into the world of sourdough fermentation, exploring its microbiology, the chemistry behind starter cultivation, and the nuances of incorporating discard into various recipes.

    Sourdough starters are living cultures of wild yeast and bacteria, unique to each environment they're cultivated in. Their maintenance involves understanding the microbial balance, hydration levels, and the symbiotic relationship between flour and water. Through numerous experiments and hands-on experiences, I've mastered the art of maintaining starters at different hydration levels, understanding their behavior, and employing various techniques to maximize their flavor potential.

    Regarding the specifics of the sourdough crepe recipe, it's a brilliant adaptation to minimize prep time and utilize excess starter. The combination of eggs, starter, and olive oil creates a rich and flavorful base, enhanced by a touch of sugar and salt for balance. The addition of milk is adjusted based on the consistency of the starter, aiming for a thin batter that cooks into delicate, slightly tangy crepes.

    The cooking process involves a careful dance on the skillet, allowing the batter to spread evenly and achieve that perfect texture: firm, lightly browned, and slightly crispy. The versatility of serving options—whipped cream, fruits, spreads like peanut butter or Nutella, and chocolate chips—adds layers of taste and texture, making it an indulgent breakfast treat or dessert.

    This recipe exemplifies the beauty of sourdough's adaptability and its ability to transform simple ingredients into something delightful and versatile. It's not just a recipe; it's a testament to the endless possibilities sourdough offers once you understand its dynamics.

    Now, let's break down the key concepts used in the article:

    1. Sourdough Starter Discard: This refers to the portion of sourdough starter that's removed before feeding or refreshing the starter. It's often discarded to maintain the right balance of microbes and hydration levels within the starter.

    2. Sourdough Starter: A mixture of flour and water that captures wild yeast and lactobacilli, fermenting over time to create a leavening agent used in baking.

    3. Fermentation: The process by which yeast and bacteria in the starter culture break down sugars to produce carbon dioxide and alcohol, causing dough to rise and giving it a characteristic flavor.

    4. Hydration Levels: The ratio of water to flour in the starter, affecting its consistency and activity. High hydration starters are more liquid, while low hydration starters are thicker.

    5. Cooking Technique: Achieving the right consistency and texture involves proper heating, batter spreading, and flipping to cook the crepes evenly without sticking or tearing.

    6. Recipe Adaptation: The article discusses combining traditional crepe-making methods with sourdough starter to create a quicker, tangier alternative, showcasing the adaptability of sourdough in various recipes.

    Understanding these concepts helps to appreciate the versatility of sourdough and how its discard can be repurposed into delectable dishes like these sourdough discard crepes.

    Sourdough Discard Crepes (2024)
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